Strengthening Others

If someone had said to me personally, or before our church congregation, “I want to strengthen you today,” I would have thought, “Well, thanks, but only God can do that.”

But during my last trek through Acts, I noticed several times the Bible said someone strengthened others. That gave me pause. How did they strengthen others? Why did the Bible phrase it that way instead of saying God strengthened them? I made a note to come back and look at those occurrences some time, and did that last week.

According to BibleStudyTools.com, the Greek word for “strengthen” in these passages means “to establish besides, strengthen more; to render more firm, confirm.” The KJV and a few other translations use “confirmed,” but most use “strengthened.” There are synonyms to this word all through the Bible, but this particular Greek word seems to be only in Acts. So for now I confined my study there.

In the first passage, Acts 14:19-23, men came from Antioch and Iconium and stoned Paul and left him for dead. But Paul got up, traveled to another city, and preached there. Then he returned to Lystra, Iconium, and Antioch—the very places that men had come from to stone him—and began “strengthening the souls of the disciples, encouraging them to continue in the faith, and saying that through many tribulations we must enter the kingdom of God” (v. 22).

You can imagine how the disciples might have been shaken. If this could happen to Paul, it could happen to them. These guys had who stoned Paul had traveled to another city to do so—what would they do to Christians in their own towns? But Paul encouraged them: Yes, we’ll face persecution. It’s part of the Christian life. But this is the true faith.

Matthew Henry says in his Commentary on the Whole Bible, Volume VI.—Acts to Revelation:

But is this the way to confirm the souls of the disciples and to engage them to continue in the faith? One would think it would rather shock them, and make them weary. No, as the matter is fairly stated and taken entire, it will help to confirm them, and fix them for Christ (p. 185).

Henry then goes on for several paragraphs bringing up other verses that talk about persecution being part of the Christian life and something even Christ experienced. 

The rest of the passage says they appointed elders in the churches, prayed, fasted, and “committed them to the Lord in whom they had believed” (v 23). No doubt these were an outworking of Paul’s encouragement.

In the second passage in Acts 15, some men were teaching newly-believing Gentiles that they had to be circumcised and keep the law of Moses (verses 1, 5). The apostles and elders met together to discuss the issue. “After there had been much debate,” Peter shared his experience of being taught by the Lord that God “made no distinction between us and them, having cleansed their hearts by faith.” To put them under the OT law would be “placing a yoke on the neck of the disciples that neither our fathers nor we have been able to bear. But we believe that we will be saved through the grace of the Lord Jesus, just as they will.” Paul and Barnabus followed with their experiences reaching Gentiles. The council confirmed that the Gentiles did not have to keep the OT ceremonial law and just asked them to observe a few things. They sent a letter with Paul, Barnabus, Judas, and Silas to the brethren in Antioch. “And when they had read it, they rejoiced because of its encouragement. And Judas and Silas, who were themselves prophets, encouraged and strengthened the brothers with many words” (verses 31-32).

Here the disciples were strengthened with truth and the rest that comes from grace. Instead of coming under a religion of works that they could never live up to, they could rejoice in the grace of God. One commentary here noted “Their work was the very reverse of those who had previously come from Judea ‘subverting the souls of the disciples (Acts 15:24).'”

The rest of the verses, Acts 15:40-41; 16:4-5; and 18:22-23, just mention that Paul, along with various companions, traveled place to place strengthening the disciples.

So from these passages, we can draw out these principles of how the apostles strengthened others:

Their presence. The elders in Jerusalem sent a letter, but they sent it with people to deliver personally, who then went on to strengthen them. Paul went back to several churches he started, watering the seed that was planted, encouraging them in person.

They shared truth and grace. God gives us strength through His Word. “Strengthen me according to your word” (Psalm 119:28b). The passage where Paul was persecuted presages Peter’s later epistle encouraging disciples not to be surprised at persecution, but to “entrust their souls to a faithful Creator while doing good.” The truth encouraged them. Then the Acts 15 passage brought them back to the foundation of grace rather than the added-on works of tradition.

They showed loving concern. Paul was so concerned for the disciples that he went back to the city of those who stoned him to encourage them. Though he was the one who had suffered, he wanted to strengthen them. Matthew Henry says of Acts 16:4-5, “that spirit of tenderness and condescension which appeared in these letters plainly showed that the apostles and elders were herein under the guidance of him who is love itself” (p. 203). What a contrast to the Pharisees, who protested at people being healed on the Sabbath in violation, not of God’s law, but their own, and who were so full of hate that they sought to have Jesus killed.

They were empathic. I love Peter’s empathy when he asks why they would put a heavy yoke on the new disciples that they had not been able to bear themselves.

Paul didn’t lessen the truth that persecution would come, but he encouraged them to bear it for Christ.

There is a sympathy that weakens and a sympathy that strengthens. One thing that stood out to me in Walter and Trudy Fremont’s book from many years ago, Formula for Family Unity, was this thought:

Parents should not take the grit out of their children’s lives by protecting them from every hardship, blow, or disappointment. Remember, adversity strengthens character. . . .

Children are resilient; they can take a lot if Mother doesn’t make them feel abused and neglected by an overly sympathetic attitude. Such a statement as, “Oh, honey, it’s so cold out there; I’m afraid you’ll freeze on your paper route,” produces a negative attitude in the mind of the child. Mother ought to say, “When you finish your paper route, I’ll have a cup of hot chocolate waiting and a good breakfast” (pp. 103-104)(2).

The mother’s second statement acknowledges the child’s difficulty and her sympathy, but in a way that braces him for what he has to face rather than leaving him wallowing in self-pity.

We can do the same as we interact with others. Sometimes we slap truth on like a band-aid without taking time to enter into another’s situation. No wonder what we say hits them the wrong way instead of ministering to them. Instead, Jesus was “touched with the feeling of our infirmities” (Hebrews 4:15, KJV). Since He “has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.” (Hebrews 4:15b-16).

Why does Acts say the apostles strengthened others instead of saying God did or the Word of God did? Strength actually came from God and His Word, but He sent it through His messengers. God often works through people. How we need to be faithful messengers, loving, caring, personally interested, sharing truth and grace.

Matthew Henry sums it up perfectly:

[Paul] preached that to them which strengthened them, which confirmed their faith in Christ, their resolutions for Christ, their pious affections to him. Disciples need to be strengthened, for they are compassed about with infirmity; ministers must do what they can to strengthen them, to strengthen them all, by directing them to Christ, and bringing them to live upon him, whose strength is perfected in their weakness, and who is himself their strength and song (p. 240).

(I often link up with some of these bloggers)

23 thoughts on “Strengthening Others

  1. Just a word about the book I mentioned, Formula for Family Unity by Walter and Trudy Fremont. Dr. Fremont was one of the most beloved and revered professors and deans of my alma mater. Though the truths and principles of this book are timeless, some of the specific applications might not carry over today. For instance, in the section I quoted from, he advocates having children walk to school. That may or may not be safe these days. Just wanted to mention that in case anyone looked the book up.

  2. Yes. God does not give us a free ride. There is work involved and our work is to believe and to serve others. I believe that we serve others through love. We strengthen them with love which is the strongest thing there is…especially love for Christ. If we are not using our faith to serve, strengthen, and build each other up than I don’t believe we have a true love for Christ.

  3. Strengthening others, I pray I have because I know how much it has helped me when strengthened by others. Happy Sunday.

  4. I hope I’m found faithful in strengthening others through encouragement and exhortation. We all need our Christian brothers and sisters to strengthen us with reminders of God’s promises.

  5. “We need to be faithful messengers, loving, caring, personally interested, sharing truth and grace.” Barbara, I so agree. It was needed in the days of Acts, and it is needed today. May we be faithful to encourage and strengthen those around us in the faith, through His Word.

  6. Really good thoughts here! Several times I have witnessed God strengthening me through others. I am grateful for that …

  7. I wish I could be better at strengthening others. I see and care for patients and their families in their weakest movements. Being able to find the right words that give strength can be challenging in hopeless situations

  8. I love this: “Strength actually came from God and His Word, but He sent it through His messengers” I want to be one of His messengers.

  9. Barbara, I really appreciate the examples you have shared here. It’s easy to think that we have to be Lone Rangers, just us and God. But, He’s created us to be interconnected with others. He’s given us giftings that we can use to strengthen others in the ways you shared here.

  10. Barbara, excellent advice and discussion here! We often don’t think about our part in community and building up the brethren. I know I have benefited from others investing in my life for the kingdom!

  11. I love this article in what it means to strengthen others. We need not only to remind others of the truth but to this with grace and genuine concern. God is the source of everything, but we need other people too as conduits of God’s love, care and provision.

  12. Thank you for this excellent study on how we can encourage others. This is spot on when it comes to what you’ve gleaned from God’s Word, but also life. How often do we see this played out? Sometimes we throw around Bible verses and wonder why they’re perceived only as platitudes. Our loving interest and empathy is required to make them real to others.

  13. I love the way you help us study the words in these verses. Thank you for encouraging us with God’s Word so we can go out and encourage and strengthen others!

  14. I appreciate this study on strengthening others, Barbara. This is a great summary, “Strength actually came from God and His Word, but He sent it through His messengers. God often works through people. How we need to be faithful messengers, loving, caring, personally interested, sharing truth and grace.”

  15. Barbara, my word for the year is “strength,” so you can imagine how much I enjoyed reading this. What a blessing to be used by God to strengthen others. Thank you for using Paul and the apostles’ example to show us how we can do that!

  16. This is so encouraging because I have drawn such strength this year from my informal community. We’ve really learned to depend on each other in ways outside of the traditional church setting, and it has been invaluable for our spiritual growth since the world has been so topsy-turvy.

  17. So much scripture here that affirms how we are to live in community, uplifting one another. Paul’s relationships with Barnabas and Silas and David’s relationship with Jonathon are relationships I’ve found intriguing and full of insights! Thanks for teaching me more today!

  18. Even though my kiddos are grown – I want to add Fremont’s book to my shelf. It sounds like a communication gem. This sentence you wrote: “Sometimes we slap truth on like a band-aid without taking time to enter into another’s situation” – it’s so important to take that time, enter into another’s situation, develop real relationship – that’s when everyday ministry becomes alive, seeds are planted and watered. When we went through The Big Challenge in 2019, we only invited people in to that challenge who were intentional, connecting in a real way with their prayers, their time and encouragement. We felt those prayers and that encouragement. It infused our journey with God’s Hope, Faith and Love. Thanks so much for sharing these:)

  19. Pingback: August Reflections | Stray Thoughts

Comments are closed.