Catching the Wind

Melanie Dobson’s Catching the Wind made me want to lay everything else aside to read it. But I also wanted to slow down and savor it and hated to see it end

The story opens with two children playing in 1940 Germany. Brigette Berthold is ten and wants to play nothing but princesses and knights. Dietmar Roth is a few years older and tolerates the game because Brigette is his favorite playmate. Plus he promised her father that he would help take care of her.

When the children’s parents are attacked by the Nazis, Dietmar and Brigette run. If they can make it to the English Channel and get across, Hopefully Dietmar can find his aunt.

After a harrowing journey, they finally do make it to English soil. But then they are separated.

Over 70 years later, Dietmar is a wealthy old man who goes by the name Daniel Knight. He has hired several private investigators to try to find Brigette, with no luck. Now his hopes rest in a reporter, Quenby Vaughn. He has read her stories about refugee children and knows she searches with her heart.

Quenby is working on her own story about a wealthy English woman, Lady Ricker, rumored to have helped and secretly supported the Nazis in the 1940s. Understandably, the woman’s descendants don’t want the story to run and aren’t cooperating.

When Mr. Knight’s arrogant solicitor approaches Quenby with Mr. Knight’s proposal, he’s not forthcoming enough to interest her. But she agrees to meet with Mr. Knight. When she learns that Brigette’s story ties in with the Rickers, she’s hooked.

There are several layers to this story—what happened to Brigette and Daniel, what was going on with Lady Ricker, and Quenby’s family history of a mother who abandoned her, which has crippled her ability to trust.

As one character says, “I believe God uses our pasts, even our regrets to help us and other people find Him.”

I listened to the audiobook (winner of a 2018 Audie award) nicely read by Nancy Peterson. This is one of my favorites of Melanie Dobson’s.

5 thoughts on “Catching the Wind

  1. Barbara, I really like Melanie Dobson’s novels—I’m reading “The Curator’s Daughter” right now, in fact. I had to think about it for a minute but I’m pretty sure I’ve read “Catching the Wind” too and enjoyed your recap. 😊

  2. Whenever I hear Dobson, I think of James Dobson … I assume no relationship though??? Your review was very good and makes this sound like a good read. I feel lately like I need a break from WWII fiction though. Seems like I have read so much of it!

    • I wondered the same thing. I just looked him up, and his daughter has a different name. But I don’t know if they are related in any other way. She doesn’t mention him on her website bio.

      I’ve thought that about WWII fiction, too. It seems so many novels are written in that time, I’d love to see some other times in history covered. But some of my favorite writers write about this period, so I am sure I’ll read plenty more. I’ll probably look for something different for the next read, though.

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